A lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine reports a rare case in an American surgical journal

The lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine Dr.Samer Alhakkak has reported a rare case in the American Journal of Surgery.

 

Separated Axillary Tuberculous Lymphadenitis: A Case Report

 

Journal of Surgery 
Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2017, Pages: 18-21 
Received: Mar. 3, 2017; Accepted: Mar. 14, 2017; Published: Mar. 27, 2017

 

Author

Samer Makki Mohamed Al-Hakkak, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Jabir Ibn Hayyan Medical University, Najaf City, Iraq

 

Abstract

 

Tuberculosis (TB) still accounts for a high burden disease. It has been estimated that one third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the most residing in developing countries. Separated axillary tuberculous lymphadenopathy is rare and described in patients without proof of previous or outstanding tuberculosis anywhere in the body. TB was supposed to be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with axillary lymphadenopathy, especially in the endemic areas of Tuberculosis. Ultrasonography features of the axillary lymph node in our patient were not as helpful in diagnosis as the biopsy of the lymph node. Axillary tuberculous lymphadenitis diagnosis depends on the complete pathological examination. It remains both diagnostic and therapeutic challenge because it mimics other pathologic processes and yields inconsistent physical and laboratory findings. Diagnosis is difficult often requiring biopsy.

 

 

Keywords

Separated, Axillary Lymphadenopathy, Tuberculosis, Ultrasound, Biopsy

 

 

 

 

 

To cite this article

 

Samer Makki Mohamed Al-Hakkak, Separated Axillary Tuberculous Lymphadenitis: A Case Report, Journal of Surgery. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 18-21. doi: 10.11648/j.js.20170502.12

 

Copyright

Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

 

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